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Fungus Cripples Central America’s Coffee Growers

06 May

A feature story in this morning New York Times by Elisabeth Malkin explores the horrific social and economic costs associated with the coffee plant fungus epidemic now affecting much of  Central America. You’ll find the full story–along with a fascinating video—here. Extracts from the story follow:

SAN LUCAS TOLIMÁN, Guatemala — When coffee rust attacked the farms clinging to the volcanic slopes above this Mayan town, the disease was unsparing, reducing mountainside rows of coffee trees to lattices of gray twigs.During last year’s harvest, Román Lec, who grows coffee on a few acres here, lost half his crop. This year, he borrowed about $2,000 for fertilizer and fungicide to protect the plants, as he did last year. But the disease returned and he lost even more. A plant-choking fungus called coffee rust, or la roya, has swept across Central America, withering trees and slashing production everywhere. As exports have plunged over the last two years, the effects have rippled through the local economies.

Four million people in Central America and southern Mexico rely on coffee for their living, and coffee rust is a major threat. Photo credit: Janet Jarman for The New York Times

Four million people in Central America and southern Mexico rely on coffee for their living, and coffee rust is a major threat.
Photo credit:
Janet Jarman for The New York Times

Big farmers hire fewer workers to pick the ripe coffee cherries that enclose the beans. Smaller farmers go into debt and sell livestock or tools to make up for the lost income. Sales fall at local merchants. Teenagers leave school to work on the farm because their parents can no longer hire outside help. At the very end of the chain are the landless migrant workers who earn just a few dollars a day.

In Central America, the pain is acute. Four million people there and in southern Mexico rely on coffee for their living, according to the Inter-American Development Bank. Twenty percent of the half-million jobs in Guatemala directly tied to the crop have already disappeared, estimated Nils Leporowski, the president of Anacafé, the country’s coffee board.

The rust outbreak has pushed many families to the edge of survival.“Roya (the coffee plant rust)has exposed the depth of the social and economic problems in terms of people’s vulnerability to the market and to climate change,” said Peter Loach, the Guatemala director of Mercy Corps, an aid agency. “What makes it different and complicated is that it’s a slow-onset natural disaster over two to three years.”

A coffee buyer waits to buy from pickers near   Lake Atitlan in Guatemala. Credit Janet Jarman for The New York Times

A coffee buyer waits to buy from pickers near Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Credit
Janet Jarman for The New York Times

 

 

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